Trek Overview

Trek Guatemala’s Sky Route Trek is a four-day, three-night journey between two of Guatemala’s most beautiful and inspiring destinations: Antigua and Lake Atitlán. Our treks are supported by comfortable safari-style tent camps, our overland “trek truck” with a hot shower and toilet, delicious food and drink, and knowledgeable guides. Along the way you’ll walk through cloud forest canopy and coffee fincas, be immersed in the sights and sounds of Guatemala’s living Mayan culture and communities, and be amazed at the kindness and warmth of its people.

And leave the heavy lifting to us! Each day you’ll travel light with day packs while we move camp and your gear from one breathtaking destination to the next.

Handcrafted adventure…in the heart of the Mundo Maya.

Trek at a Glance

Day 1: Mayan Shrines & Cloud Forest

Our journey begins with candles & ancient traditions before trekking into the lush Guatemalan countryside

Antigua to Terra Camp

Leaving Antigua, day one begins with a 30-minute shuttle ride to the town of San Andrés Itzapa, home to a shrine dedicated to the Mayan deity “San Simón”. Here, guests can witness locals as they pay their respects to the mysterious San Simon, and even light a candle to bless their travels.

From there, a short drive takes us to our trailhead where we begin our trek that ascends out of vegetable and fruit plantations into lush Guatemalan cloud forest, topping out at nearly 8,700 ft / 2,650 mt. Acatenango Volcano, the highest in the Antigua Valley, looms overhead as we begin to descend through thick cloud forest down to a beautiful, grassy saddle between two mountain peaks. From there, it’s a short climb into a forested protected area where we have lunch in a sunny and secluded clearing.

Following lunch, we descend through the protected area, trekking below towering trees covered in epiphytic plants such as orchids and bromeliads before we arrive at Terra Camp. After a hot shower and appetizers, guests warm up around a campfire before sitting down for a delicious dinner.

Elevation & Distance Profile: Day 1

Day 2: Mountain Peaks & Fertile Valleys

Descending into the La Vega River valley and then climbing to Fuego Camp, Day 2 is both challenging and stunning

Terra Camp to Fuego Camp

Day two of the trek begins with a long descent through forest and agricultural fields into the La Vega River valley, more than 1900 ft / 580 m below where we cross a hanging foot bridge over the river (allowing you to embrace your inner Indiana Jones!) before a challenging yet spectacular afternoon 2400 ft / 730 m climb up through coffee plantations to our lunch spot located near a quaint Mayan village. After lunch, we make a final push upwards to arrive at Fuego Camp by late-afternoon.

Upon arrival, our staff meets you with a welcome drink to quench your thirst. Time to pull up a chair, kick off your boots, and take in the panoramic view that includes a first-row seat to Fuego Volcano, one of the world’s most active volcanoes that’s been going regularly since the Spanish conquest. With luck, it will light up the night sky with plumes of molten lava.

Around the campfire, a local women’s group will show you how to make traditional Guatemala corn tortillas by hand (trust us, it’s harder than it looks) before we sit down for dinner and a good night’s rest.

Elevation & Distance Profile: Day 2

Day 3: Mayan Pueblos & Volcano Views

Tranquil rural communities and patchwork fields dot the landscape as we follow a high ridge line that offers views of six volcanoes

Fuego Camp to Agua Camp

Day three immerses guests in the finest natural scenery that Guatemala has to offer. A morning push takes guests to the highest point of the trek, just over 9,000 ft / 2,745 m. We follow a pristine ridgeline with panoramic views of six volcanoes and cloud forest that reveals unique plants and birds.

Along the way, we take the opportunity to talk with local farmers tending their terraced fields and learn about traditional agricultural practices. A long, gradual descent leads us to our trail lunch location (and a short siesta) before we finish the day by walking into Agua Camp, named in honor of Lake Atitlán, which can be seen in the distance below.

After relaxing a bit, we venture into the local Mayan community of Chuinimachicaj to visit a women’s cooperative that specializes in traditional backstrap weaving, an ancient art practiced for centuries in Guatemala and still used to weave fabric for clothing and other household textiles.

Elevation & Distance Profile: Day 3

Day 4: Coffee Fincas & Crystal Waters

The last day of the trek includes a coffee farm tour and a push to our final destination…Lake Atitlán

Agua Camp to Lake Atitlán

The final day of the trek begins with a 2,700 ft / 820 m descent into the La Madre Vieja River valley that weaves through a patchwork of traditional agricultural fields and small villages. Once in the valley, we visit a picturesque coffee finca to learn about the planting, harvesting and processing of small-batch specialty coffee (and of course, sample some as well).

Following the coffee tour, we cross the river on another hanging footbridge before a short ascent that takes us up to the rim of Lake Atitlán and expansive views of the water below and three massive volcanoes that surround it.

From there, a final descent through terraced fields of flowers and vegetables takes us to the lakeside village of San Antonio Palopó to conclude the trek. Congratulations…you made it!

Elevation & Distance Profile: Day 4

Ummmm...what about a toilet?

Not to worry! Each trip is supported by our overland “Trek Truck”, a modified vehicle that not only carries our gear from camp to camp, but also features a nifty hot water shower, portable flush toilet and sink. It’s private, but you can look up at the stars as you rinse a little trail dust off each night.

What’s Included

What’s Not Included

FAQs

Is the trek safe?

Our trek passes through quiet, rural Maya farming communities that pride themselves on being welcoming to visitors. As you hike through agricultural areas, local farmers often stop to say hello while villagers are quick to share an “Hola!” as we pass through. Our treks have never had a single issue with safety or security.

Is Guatemala safe?

We understand that most international news regarding Guatemala is often negative. Unfortunately, this news doesn’t always reflect the reality here. Yes, there are pockets of Guatemala City that you might not want to visit (much like any major city worldwide), but you won’t come close to those areas. Antigua is peaceful, as are villages around the Lake…and Guatemalans are some of the kindest people on the planet.

What’s the weather like?

From November to April/May, the weather along our trekking route is characterized by warm, sunny days (65-80°F/16-29°C) & cool evenings (35-50°F/2-10°C). Although technically the dry season, Guatemala’s highlands can get some rain & mist as well, particularly at night.

Do I need any special immunizations?

Antigua, Lake Atitlán and our trekking route are not located in any tropical areas where you need special immunizations for diseases like malaria, dengue, etc. Although bugs are nearly non-existent along the route, we do recommend you pack some bug repellant for your trip.

Is the trek hard?

Although every hiker is unique, the short answer is yes…the trek is designed to challenge guests each day. 7-9 miles per day is average, with a few thousand feet in elevation change…all taking place at elevations between 6,000 to 9,000 feet . But it’s not a death march. We leave camp each morning around 8:30, and are usually arriving to our next camp by 4pm each afternoon. Hikers can go at their own pace, and to date it’s been done by a 68-year old Grandmother as well as a group of 9 to 12-year-old children.

How about bathrooms and showers?

Not to worry! Each trip is supported by our overland “trek truck”, a modified vehicle that not only carries our gear from camp to camp, but also features a nifty hot water shower, portable flush toilet and sink. It’s private, but you can look up at the stars as you rinse a little trail dust off each night.

What are the tents like?

Our 10’ x 14’ canvas tents are spacious, comfortable, and fit up to two queen-size inflatable mattresses along with a shared bedside table. The comforters are goose-down and we provide hot water bottles as well to guests to ensure a warm and cozy night’s sleep.

What is the food like?

Our food is a highlight for most of the guests on our trek. We serve a fusion of traditional Guatemalan dishes and international cuisine. The food is fresh, healthy and most importantly delicious! Vegetarian and vegan options available. We also offer a full bar along the trek with beer, wine and liquor.

Is a packing list provided?

Yes! We provide a detailed “packing primer” that includes suggestions for clothing and equipment to guests to bring.

What happens with our luggage?

Each day of the trek, guests hike only with daypacks carrying their clothes, 2-3 L of water and personal items. Larger overnight luggage is transported from one beautiful camp to the next via our Trek Truck, and is waiting for you upon arrival.

How large is each trekking group?

Our maximum group size is 12 guests.

What’s the best way to get and from to Guatemala?

Direct flights to Guatemala City (which is one hour from Antigua) arrive from Los Angeles, Houston, Atlanta and Miami.

Will there be a need for extra money along the trip?

Guatemala is famous for its handicrafts, which include woven fabrics, carved wood and ceramics. Both Antigua and Lake Atitlán provide opportunities for shopping.

Pricing & Group Sizes